A marker at the intersection of USH 151 and STH 55 talks about the history of the Brothertown Indians in the area.
A marker at the intersection of USH 151 and STH 55 talks about the history of the Brothertown Indians in the area.
(Editor's note: This is the third in a four-part series about the Brothertown Indians. This week comments are heard from two leaders and active members of the tribe.)

Of the 11 tribes generally listed for Wisconsin, Brothertown is the only federally non-recognized tribe.
Members of the tribe continue their efforts for recognition.
The Department of the Interior found in 2012 that the DOI lacked the authority through the administrative process of the Office of Federal Acknowledgment of the Bureau of Indian Affairs to recognize the tribe. Since the Congressional Act of 1839 had terminated the government-to-government status between the U.S. and the Brothertown Indians, only Congress could restore federal recognition. In the year since the Final Determination was published by the DOI, the Brothertown Indian Nation, through its council and other tribal leaders, has developed a strategic plan for Congressional restoration legislation.
This is a process that has engaged local, state and federal leaders and legislators in an educational and discussion process regarding the Brothertown Indian history including that of the recognition and restoration process in efforts of partnering with each of these intergovernmental groups.
"Our hope would be that by the end of this year, a proposal for legislative restoration could be introduced to committee in the Senate,' according to Dr. Faith Ottery, a member of the Brothertown Indian Council and a member of the Recognition/Restoration Committee. Ottery has been active in the tribe since the 1980s but has most recently served as a facilitator of many of the federal recognition activities.


(Please see the October 24 issue of the Tri-County News for more on this story.)

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